Benefits of Spaying or Neutering Dogs

What are the benefits of spaying or neutering dogs? If you have recently adopted a puppy or an adult dog, you are probably wondering about the advantages of having your dog spayed or neutered.

Below you will find answers to some of the most common questions dog owners ask about these surgeries.

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benefits of spaying and neutering dogs

MEDICAL BENEFITS OF SPAYING OR NEUTERING DOGS

Neutering improves the general health of your dog, whether male or female. Likewise, it can eliminate associated risks to your pet’s health, such as some types of cancer and deadly infections.

In the case of your female pet, she will have a longer and healthier life. Spaying eliminates the possibility of malign mammary tumors in about 50 percent of dogs. Also, spaying your female dog prevents uterus infections such as pyometra, which can be very expensive to treat and potentially fatal.

At the same time, neutering your male dog prevents testicular cancer and some prostate problems.
Besides, neutering can prevent behavior problems such as scent marking and straying.
Neutered males are less likely to show aggression towards other dogs.

NEUTERING OR SPAYING WILL IMPROVE YOUR DOG BEHAVIOR

Neutering your male dog can improve some behaviors. For example, neutering your canine friend decreases undesirable behaviors, such as scent marking and straying.

SPAYING OR NEUTERING YOUR DOG SAVES YOU MONEY

Spaying and neutering can help you save money. The cost of spay or neuter surgery is less expensive than the costs of unplanned pregnancies and raising puppies. Similarly, you may reduce vet bills associated with certain illnesses.

WHEN SPAYING OR NEUTERING YOUR DOG? 

Although the vet can do these procedures on puppies as young as six or nine months, dog owners should consult with their veterinarian to determine the best age to spay or neuter their pet.

The AKC Canine Health Foundation-sponsored research indicates there may be long-term health benefits to spaying or neutering dogs after they have passed puberty. The benefits of castration after puberty may include:
• Reduction in orthopedic health problems.
• Decrease in certain types of cancer in specific breeds and a possible improvement in behavior. (Reference: AKC)

Many veterinarians recommend spaying female puppies before their first heat, which can occur as early as five months. However, there are pieces of evidence of poor development and growth in puppies so young.

RECOVERY TIPS FOR SPAYED AND NEUTERED DOGS

Before surgery, some pre-surgical tips are:
• Do not feed your dog after midnight the night before surgery.
After surgery:
• Provide your pet a quiet place to recover indoors and away from other pets or children.
• Do not allow your pet to jump or run until two weeks after surgery.
• Depending on the procedure performed, your vet may prescribe pain medications.
• Avoid bathing your dog for at least ten days after surgery.
• To prevent your pet from licking the incision site, wear an Elizabethan collar.
• Follow your veterinarian’s instructions for the care and cleaning of the incision and check daily to confirm proper healing.
• If you notice redness, swelling, or discharge, or if the incision is open, contact your veterinarian.
• Also, call your veterinarian if your pet is lethargic, has a poor appetite, vomiting or diarrhea, or has any other concerns after surgery.

SOME MYTHS AND MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT SPAYING AND NEUTERING

  • Spaying or neutering will not make your pet overweight. Lack of exercise and overfeeding will cause your pet to pack extra pounds, not neutering. Your pet will stay fit and trim if you continue to provide exercise and control food intake.
    • Neutering is not a quick fix for all behavior problems. Although the procedure often reduces undesirable behaviors caused by higher testosterone, there’s no guarantee that your dog’s behavior will change after the sterilization. Although surgery will reduce the amount of testosterone in your dog’s system, it will not eliminate the hormone.
    • Castrating your dog will also not reduce behaviors that your pet has learned or has become habitual. The effects  depend on your dog’s personality, physiology, and history.
Image credit: Pixabay. Unsplash Pexels

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